Mushrooms & Greens Top The List Of 37 ‘Electrogenic’ Vegetables Needed By The Gut


Mushrooms & Greens Top The List Of 37 ‘Electrogenic’ Vegetables Needed By The Gut


We already know that the gut is the second brain of the body and to operate this ‘bio-computing instrument’ the gut needs an electrical charge from gut bacteria. Gut bacteria needs to obtain the catalysts for generating an electrical charge from food, particularly food containing flavins.

Electricity-generating, or "electrogenic", bacteria isn't new. Scientists have known about this for years and experiments and studies are underway right now on how to harness electricity from bacteria.

Nexus magazine recently reported that scientists also found gut bacteria needed flavin proteins to survive. Flavin, a variant of vitamin B2, densely populates the gut. The researchers later found that the bacteria not only needed flavin to survive, but that extra, free-floating flavin in the surrounding environment could enhance the bacteria's electrical activity.

Nexus: ‘In a commentary published in Nature Magazine, University of Illinois microbiologists Laty Cahoon and Nancy Freitag, wrote, "It is a shock to the system to consider that microbes might be living highly charged lives in our gut." Knowledge of this new electricity-generating pathway "might create opportunities for the design of bacteria-based energy-generating technologies," the researchers wrote’.

Rather than create new technologies why not just eat foods, which support the production of electricity in the gut. All motion based actions and reactions in the body require either an electrical charge and/or enzymes to power-up the process.

Often you will be drawn to certain vegetables. This is your body sending subtle messages of ‘plant desire’ to your thought process by way of the gut brain. This whole area of bioelectrical charging through vegetables and fruit is becoming more and more fascinating.

Several varieties of mushrooms top the list of ‘electric veg’ along with a number of green vegetables.

What is your favourite ‘electrical veg’?

1.  White Button Mushrooms (stir-fried)
0.5mg (38% DV) in 1 cup sliced

2.  Portabello (exposed To Sunlight Or Uv)
0.5mg (38% DV) in 1 cup sliced

3.  Cooked White Button Mushrooms
0.5mg (36% DV) in 1 cup pieces

4.  Kidney Bean Sprouts
0.5mg (35% DV) in 1 cup

5.  Sun-dried Hot Chile Peppers
0.4mg (34% DV) in 1 cup

6.  Crimini Mushrooms
0.4mg (33% DV) in 1 cup whole

7.   Crimini Mushrooms (exposed To Sunlight Or Uv)
0.4mg (33% DV) in 1 cup whole

8.  Cooked Spinach
0.4mg (33% DV) in 1 cup

9.  Cooked Beet Greens
0.4mg (32% DV) in 1 cup (1 Inch pieces)

10.  Dried Ancho Peppers
0.4mg (29% DV) in 1 pepper

11.  Spirulina
0.3mg (26% DV) in 100 grams

12.   Kimchi
0.3mg (24% DV) in 1 cup

13.  Oyster Mushrooms
0.3mg (23% DV) in 1 cup sliced

14.   White Button Mushrooms
0.3mg (22% DV) in 1 cup, pieces or slices

15.  White Button Mushrooms (exposed To Sunlight Or Uv)
0.3mg (22% DV) in 1 cup pieces or slices

16.  Cooked Artichokes (globe Or French)
0.3mg (20% DV) in 1 cup

17.  Dried Spirulina Seaweed
0.3mg (20% DV) in 1 tablespoon

18.  Asparagus (cooked)
0.3mg (19% DV) in 1 cup

19.  Cooked Shiitake Mushrooms
0.2mg (19% DV) in 1 cup pieces

20.  Canned Asparagus
0.2mg (19% DV) in 1 cup

21.  Cooked Green Peas
0.2mg (18% DV) in 1 cup

22.   Mashed Sweet Potatoes
0.2mg (18% DV) in 1 cup

23.  Dried Pasilla Peppers
0.2mg (17% DV) in 1 pepper

24.   Cooked Garden Cress
0.2mg (17% DV) in 1 cup

25.   Fiddlehead Ferns
0.2mg (16% DV) in 100 grams

26.   Wood Ear Mushroom
0.2mg (16% DV) in 1 cup slices

27.  Cooked Collards
0.2mg (15% DV) in 1 cup, chopped

28.  Canned Tomato Puree
0.2mg (15% DV) in 1 cup

29.  Cooked New Zealand Spinach
0.2mg (15% DV) in 1 cup, chopped

30.  Broccoli (cooked)
0.2mg (15% DV) in 1 cup chopped

31.  Peas
0.2mg (15% DV) in 1 cup

32.   Cooked Pumpkin

0.2mg (15% DV) in 1 cup, mashed

33.  Cooked Podded Peas

0.2mg (15% DV) in 1 cup

34. Stirfried Soybean Sprouts

0.2mg (15% DV) in 100 grams

35.  Asparagus

0.2mg (15% DV) in 1 cup

36.  Pea Sprouts

0.2mg (14% DV) in 1 cup

37. Cooked Dandelion Greens

0.2mg (14% DV) in 1 cup, chopped

A full list of over 200 vegetables is available from the myfooddata website.

The key remains though to having a balanced in-take of vegetables on a daily basis some of which contain excellent plant based proteins, starches (which also promote the expansion of gut bacteria population), simple carbohydrates and oils.

However even if you are putting great fruit and vegetables into your system it is imperative to have a fully optimised and efficient gut process. More and more folk turning to a plantbased lifestyle continue to have gut issues.

This is where the green papaya powder or the green papaya, pineapple and turmeric combination come into play. You can kick-start the gut maceration process right now by CLICKING HERE for the papaya products and heaps more fabulously supportive information.

Would you like a FREE 15-minute telephone, skype, Facetime or WhatsApp to have a high level conversation about where you can go with changing food intake patterns and understanding about your personal gut function? CLICK HERE

Would you like a consultation with Scott Mathias, Certified Holistic Health Counselor and Author of four books on Gut health and following a plant based lifestyle?  CLICK HERE

The US Food and Drug Administration have not evaluated statements in this article and information shared is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Copyright 2018 Scott Mathias & GUTFIXx.com

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